Oscars Preview – Our Picks


The Wee Review team give their verdict on who will win what at this year’s Academy Awards.

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Just a fortnight to go until the world’s biggest cinematic glamathon descends upon Hollywood. At last year’s extravaganza, glorified bean counters PricewaterhouseCoopers ended up with egg all over their face after proving themselves as adept at envelope handling as they are at using the spacebar.

Will we be treated to similar drama this time around? Who will win? Who won’t? Who will think they’ve won, only to discover they haven’t? We haven’t got a clue, but we know who we think should. After much consultation in darkened rooms and across email servers, The Wee Review team have come up with their picks for all categories at this year’s ceremony – see if you agree below.

Best Picture – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

It was a close run thing, with Call Me By Your Name and The Shape of Water giving Martin McDonagh’s gritty drama a run for its money, but in the end Three Billboards just squeaked over the line – notwithstanding the attendant hoo-ha which seems almost obligatory for Oscars hopefuls these days.

Lead Actor – Gary Oldman (Darkest Hour)  

After missing out on the same accolade to French star Jean Dujardin in 2012, Oldman looks to finally pick up the gong his versatility and talent deserves for his portrayal of curmudgeonly commander-in-chief, Winston Churchill.

Lead Actress – Frances McDormand (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)

It’s testament to McDormand’s performance that even in the company of such strong competition this year, she romped home as favourite among The Wee Review writers.

Supporting Actor – Sam Rockwell (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)

Despite the controversy surrounding his character, Rockwell’s portrayal of the bigoted, bolshy police officer Dixon is the only category in the entire list of awards which saw a unanimous verdict from The Wee Review. Surely a shoo-in.

Support Actress – Mary J. Blige (Mudbound)  

Fighting off strong competition from Allison Janney, Laurie Metcalf and Octavia Spencer, Mary J. Blige transcends her RnB roots and the film’s straight-to-Netflix status with an authoritative performance as the matriarch of her put-upon family.

Director – Christopher Nolan (Dunkirk)  

In the battle of big-name directors yet to win an Oscar, Nolan just about bests his fantastical adversary Guillermo del Toro with a stirring retelling of the evacuation of Dunkirk in World War II.

Animated Feature – Coco

This delightful Disney/Pixar collaboration uses the backdrop of the Mexican Day of the Dead to explore the importance of family and remembering those who’ve passed on. Joyful stuff, and a clear winner among The Wee Review team.

Animated Short – Dear Basketball

In November 2015, Kobe Bryant handed in his resignation to basketball by penning a lengthy love letter to the sport. Glen Keane brings his words to life with this animated re-imagining of the man’s career.

Adapted Screenplay – Call Me By Your Name

Based upon the coming-of-age novel of the same name by André Aciman, this is a touching story of a romance between a 17-year-old boy and his father’s assistant in a sleepy Italian town in the north of the country.

Original Screenplay – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Hold the front page! Four awards predicted for this Coen Brothers-esque tale of small town squabbling from the pen of director McDonagh.

Cinematography – Blade Runner 2049

From gigantic lascivious billboards to two women inhabiting one body, the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s 1982 classic was a visual delight that held off strong challenges from The Shape of Water and Dunkirk.

Best Documentary Feature – Icarus

This fascinating peek behind the curtain of the sports world to marvel at the murky dopings which transpire there took the biscuit for our writers.

Best Documentary Short Subject – Traffic Stop

Captured on dashcam footage from a Texan police car, this documentary concentrates the plight of an African-American schoolteacher in particular and on race relations in the States in general.

Best Live Action Short Film – DeKalb Elementary

Particularly salient in the light of the nightmarish occurrences in Florida last week, DeKalb Elementary is inspired by a real-life emergency call that took place during a school shooting in Atlanta, Georgia.

Best Foreign Language Film – Loveless

Bleak and beautiful – that’s how Andrey Zvyagintsev likes ‘em. Following on from his near Oscar miss in 2014 with Leviathian, our writers have tipped the Russian to scoop his gong this time.

Film Editing – Dunkirk

Nolan’s WWII epic sails in for its second award of the evening for being dead good at chopping-up-and-sticking-back-together bits of footage.

Sound Editing – Baby Driver

Anyone who took in Edgar Wright’s slick and stylish getaway-driving thriller will know that much of its charm was down to the strong soundtrack and the smooth choreography that accompanied it…

Sound Mixing – Baby Driver

… which is why the film has waltzed off with both sound prizes in this year’s edition, according to The Wee Review boffins.

Production Design – Blade Runner 2049

It’s perhaps possible that The Shape of Water suffered from a later UK release in these predictions, though Blade Runner 2049 is a deserving winner for the impressiveness of its sets and scenery nonetheless.

Original Score – Dunkirk

Hans Zimmer has only bloody gone and done it again! Having been nominated 11 times, it seems incredible that Zimmer has only won one previous Oscar… but then again, old adversary John Williams has a staggering 51 noms and 5 wins to his name. Williams has a horse in the race again this time but we’re backing Zimmer.

Original Song – “This Is Me (The Greatest Showman)  

Fending off strong competition from Coco, the original composition by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul is performed by Keala Settle, bagging itself a top five spot in the UK billboards upon release.

Makeup and Hair – Darkest Hour

Another near-unanimous decision from The Wee Review team – and it’s not hard to see why. Slim and hirsute Gary Oldman as tubby and bald Winston Churchill? Give over. The transformation is quite remarkable.

Costume Design – The Shape of Water

Guillermo del Toro has a fantastic knack for spiriting away his audience with an otherworldly set design in all his films, and costume maestro Luis Sequeira matches that vision superbly.

Visual Effects – Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049 joins Dunkirk on three awards for the evening, putting both just one place behind Three Billboards.

Disagree wildly with our choices? Let us have what for in the comments section below.