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Robin Morgan: Honeymoon

at Laughing Horse @ The Pear Tree

* * * - -

Enjoyable solo show from new groom Morgan.

Image of Robin Morgan: Honeymoon

Robin Morgan married his childhood sweetheart at the end of July and three days later left for the Edinburgh Fringe. Alone. In an enjoyable set the comedian riffs on everything from relationships, to dad guilt, to the best supermarket meal deals.

Morgan arrives on stage in a suit and undone bow-tie, looking like he’s just legged it from his wedding reception, but don’t be alarmed – his bride is aware he’s on honeymoon without her. The decision to forgo a fancy holiday after tying the knot was a financial and practical one and of course, it makes a fun premise for his Free Fringe show!

The comedian makes light of his “generic” appearance. White, male, middle class millennial stand-ups are ubiquitous so what sets Morgan apart from his contemporaries? He’s nice (and that’s not an insult) with an unforced, genuine charm that so many of his sneering counterparts seem to lack. His audience interactions are enjoyable, particularly with a couple of friends (both called John) who are on a lad’s holiday despite being recently married themselves and a Glaswegian couple who have been married more than 30 years.

Morgan isn’t afraid to take the piss out of himself – erectile dysfunction initially hampered his attempts to lose his virginity and he tells the audience about the time he was on Sky Sports News wearing his mother’s coat.  Further anecdotes about millennials having to work until their 90s and the state of the housing market keep the audience chuckling in recognition as the show whizzes along.

Honeymoon is a pleasant way to pass 50 minutes, but Morgan recognises there is a distinct lack of drama in his life. He married the first girl he had sex with, his stag do was uneventful, he’s never been in a fight (although someone offers to headbutt him for cash). He writes good jokes and weaves a good story but the lack of jeopardy and drama in his storytelling prevents the show from rising from good to great.