EDINBURGH | GLASGOW | ABERDEEN | INVERNESS | DUNDEE | PERTH

The 900 Club

at Scottish Poetry Library

* * * * -

A poignant, intimate and honest spoken word theatre show.

Image of The 900 Club

Ross McFarlane, Bibi June, Ellen Renton and Shannon O’Neill are the four performers from spoken word theatre company In The Works and they have brought their new show to the Edinburgh Fringe. The 900 Club is centred around four friends as they reconvene after having spent five years apart. They are together in order to commemorate the death of their friend Noah. The 900 Club refers to the bus number that travels from Glasgow to Edinburgh and this bus is the location of the show. The performance covers many themes including memory, guilt, mental health, self care, death and friendship. A lot is packed into the hour and it is heart-warming and delightful experience.

The Scottish Poetry Library is a safe haven just off the busy Edinburgh tourist spot of the Royal Mile. The venue presents many poetry and spoken word events throughout the year and it is a very much welcome Fringe venue this August. The SPL is hosting The 900 Club and is an ideal venue to present a show based on words, language and togetherness.

There is a dynamic nature to the show with each of the performers riffing off one another. Half rhyme, inventive turn of phrase and lyrical rhythms tie the performance together and ensure the language is vibrant and bold. At times the performers break into song with R.E.M, Billy Joel and Ben E. King all adding to the rhythm and giving the performance a distinct musical feel. This rhythm allows the show to flow along with an unabashed ease and takes the audience along for the ride.

The 900 Club concludes with each performer given the space to bestow a heartfelt eulogy to their deceased friend Noah. Each monologue is performed with poise, heart and honesty. The 900 Club is the kind of show that will make you want to check up on an old friend and build bridges with people who you may have lost a connection with. It underlines the value of friendship and the value of talking about personal roblems. The heavy and important subject matter of death is presented with care and the audience never feels like they are in unsafe or dangerous hands. The topics are tackled with love and emotion and this makes The 900 Club feel deeply poignant, intimate and special.